HISTORY & ETHOS

Dedication to Excellence

Our commitment to excellence is made possible through the dedication and loyalty of every member of the BSA Guns family. Our employees believe that quality, service and standards of excellence should never be compromised:

Research & Creativity

Excellence in research and creativity results in exciting and creative new products that meet the changing needs of the consumer.

Quality

Excellence in quality manufacturing practices guarantees products that exceed industry standards.

Customer Service

Excellence in customer service assures loyalty and happy customers.

BSA Since 1861

  • 1861 Company formed
  • 1864 First Government military arms contract

Prior to 1905 all work undertaken by BSA was for UK and Foreign Government contracts, no commercial work was undertaken.

  • 1905 Manufacture 1st Lincoln Jeffries air rifle
  • 1906 Contract to make 100,000 rifles for the War Office, (War Office pattern miniature .22)
  • 1907 10,000th Lincoln Jeffries air rifle made
  • 1909 Introduction of BSA's first commercial sporting & target rifle, a Martini action that continued in production until 1986
  • 1910Contract to make 60,000 .310 Martini rifles for Australian Government
  • 1911 Production of first mass produced shotgun in .410
  • 1914 Rifle production increased from 135 to 10,000 per week in two years to meet demand of WW1
  • 1915 1st Lewis Gun manufactured
  • 1919 Company restructured into three divisions
  • 1920 Production of 12 bore double barrel shotgun
  • 1933 1st BSA break barrel air rifle, 'Breakdown Pattern'
  • 1939to 1945 BSA manufacture over 50% of all small arms used by British forces in WW2
  • 1940Factory covers 32 acres, bombed 3 times in 3 months destroying 4.5 acres, 53 killed & 89 injured

During WW2 BSA made:

  • 568,100 .303 Browning machine guns
  • 1,250,000 .303 Lee Enfield rifles
  • 60,000 7.92 'BESA' machine guns
  • 1945 Manufacture of 1st Cadet air rifle
  • 1946 Manufacture of Cadet Major air rifle
  • 1948 Manufacture of 1st Airsporter air rifle
  • 1949 Manufacture of 1st Gold Medal winning Martini International .22 target rifle
  • 1950 Awarded Government contract to produce 1st Self Loading Rifle (SLR) in NATO 7.62
  • 1954 Introduction of Hunter sporting rifle
  • 1959 Introduction of the 'Majestic Range' of classic sporting air rifles
  • 1959 Introduction of 1st air rifle to have a telescopic sight, the Meteor
  • 1962 Introduction of Meteor Mk2
  • 1962 Introduction of Merlin air rifle
  • 1962 Introduction of Armatic .22 self loading rifle
  • 1962 Introduction of Airsporter Mk2 air rifle
  • 1962 Introduction Snipe single barrel 12 bore shotgun
  • 1963 Introduction of the High Power sporting rifle
  • 1965 Introduction of the Monarch sporting rifle
  • 1968 Introduction of Meteor Super air rifle
  • 1972 Introduction of the CF2 range of sporting rifles
  • 1972 Introduction of Mercuary air rifle
  • 1973 Introduction of Scorpion air pistol
  • 1977 Introduction of the Buccaneer air rifle
  • 1980 Introduction of the Mercury S air rifle
  • 1982 Special edition of 1000 Centenary Airsporters to commemorate 100 years since the registration of Piled Arms Trade Mark
  • 1985 Introduction of Challenger air rifle
  • 1985 Introduction of Maxi Grip scope rail
  • 1985 Introduction of Airsporter Stutzen air rifle
  • 1985 Introduction of Shadow and Trooper Carbine air rifles
  • 1985 Gamo Ownership
  • 1986 Production of VS2000 prototype, first repeating air rifle (not produced commercially) but some features latter used in the SuperTEN
  • 1986 BSA Guns liquidated, bought by Gamo and renamed BSA Guns (UK) Ltd
  • 1986 Introduction of Supersport air rifle
  • 1987 Introduction of Meteor Challanger and Airsporter Carbine air rifles
  • 1990 Introduction of Superstar, 1st rotary breech air rifle
  • 1991 Introduction of Goldstar, 1st commercial repeating air rifle
  • 1992 Introduction of Airsporter RB2 rotary breech air rifle
  • 1992 Introduction of shotgun type safety catch on Airsporter RB2 air rifle
  • 1993 Introduction of Meteor Mk6 air rifle
  • 1994 Introduction of .240 Magnum air pistol
  • 1996 Introduction of SuperTEN, 1st BSA pre-charged pneumatic air rifle
  • 1997 Introduction of Supersport Lightning air rifle
  • 1999 Introduction of SuperTEN Mk2 pre-charged pneumatic air rifle
  • 1999 Introduction of Spitfire pre-charged pneumatic air rifle
  • 2001 Introduction of Firebird rotary breech pre-charged pneumatic air rifle
  • 2002 BSA took on the distribution of Gamo products in the UK
  • 2003 Introduction of the Superten Bull Barrel
  • 2003 Introduction of the Hornet
  • 2003 Hornet awarded "Best New Hunting Air Rifle" by Shooting Times
  • 2004 Introduction of the Hornet Multishot
  • 2005 Special edition of 100 Superten and Lightning XL to celebrate 100 years of Airgun manufacture
  • 2005 Introduction of the Scorpion
  • 2005 Introduction of the Ultra
  • 2006 Introduction of the XL Tactical
  • 2006 Introduction of the Comet
  • 2007 Introduction of the Scorpion T-10
  • 2007 Introduction of the Lonestar
  • 2008 R-10 Launch
  • 2010 New Ultra Launched
  • 2011 150th anniversary
  • 2011 R-10 Mk2
  • 2011 Scorpion SE Launched
  • 2012 Ultra SE launched
  • 2012 BSA First .25 multishot introduced
  • 2012 Spring Gun range updated
  • 2012 Gas Ram Rifles introduced
  • 2012 XL Tactical production returned to Birmingham
  • 2013 Scorpion Cadet '3P' becomes the only official PCP Rifle approved for use by the British Army Cadets
  • 2013 R-10 'Woodland' & 'Black Editions' Launched
  • 2013 A Brand New PCP 'The Buccaneer SE' is launched for Export Sales
  • 2013 Expansion into New and Historical Export Markets
  • 2013 Major Investment in BSA's Head Quarters on Armoury Road
  • 2014 Launch of BSA Ultra 'Colours' Range
  • 2014 Launch of R-10 Mk in .25 Cal

In a little over hundred years BSA has grown from a small union of gunsmiths to become one of Britain's important industrial groups. The story is not entirely one of steady progress and expansion there is drama and excitement too. And because BSA has served its country more directly than most private concerns, its story is also part of Britain's history.